It’s not about the details, it’s about the overall customer experience.

stuck on detailsAfter you have read a hundred articles by various people about how in the world of ecommerce it’s all about the details, step back and ignore them for a few minutes.

Yes, the details can make a difference.

But they won’t do you a lick of good unless you get the big picture right first. In fact, all the details should point in the same direction – towards optimizing the customer experience.

Whatever your online business, you won’t be remembered for moving that image from the right side of the page to the left side. You won’t be remembered for the size or font of your headlines either.

But what every visitor and customer will remember is the quality of the experience they had at your site, whether they have made a purchase yet or not.

This has always been the genius of Amazon.com. (And no, I’m not going to apologize for using Amazon as an example.)

Amazon has always been about the customer experience.

First, they have worked tirelessly to make it as easy and as fast as possible for you to find the exact product you are looking for.

Next, they offer you a good price, and a shopping cart that is simple to use.

They also deliver your goods faster than you expected, most of the time.

And they make it easy for you to return items if you want to.

In other words, they have worked on and optimized every aspect of the experience that really matters.

No, their site doesn’t go through snazzy upgrades in its look and feel. In fact, their site looks astonishingly ordinary. And there is a reason for that. That ordinary, unchanging, and familiar layout makes it easy for us to move through the site and complete our purchase. We know how the site works. We know where everything is. We remember.

This all makes sense, right?

Well, when I talk to or consult with companies marketing online they are generally far too focused on the details, and ignore the overall customer experience.

They fret about their logo or its position on the page. And they often feel offended when I tell them that the only person in the world who cares about making small changes to their logo is them.

The same goes for the color of their headlines, or any other finer point of layout.

I don’t care. I’m not bothered by any of the little stuff, unless it impacts on the customer experience. If a small change helps visitors find or buy what they want, I’ll fight for that change. If it makes it harder, I’ll fight against it. If it makes no difference at all, then I don’t care.

So if you are going to fret about the details of your website, or a client’s website, always ask the question:

Does this enhance the customer experience, detract from it, or make no difference?

Ask that question and you’ll save a huge amount of time messing about with details that don’t matter.

At the same time, you’ll ensure that every change you do make is for a very good reason.

About the author: Nick Usborne is an online writer, copywriter, author and coach.

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1 thought on “It’s not about the details, it’s about the overall customer experience.

  1. Sometimes it feels like changing the website is a job that never gets done. Thank you for providing a good metric for evaluating whether a change to a website is necessary or not. I will remember this.

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